Who is eligible to apply for the NHF Scholarship?

Eligible applicants must be:

  • A Norwalk public housing development tenant in good standing with the NHA at time of award (Section 8 residents are not eligible)
  • Currently living in a NHA development and have lived there for a minimum of one year
  • A high school senior planning to attend college, a recent high school graduate, a current college student, an adult who has received their GED and returning to college or a graduate student attending or planning to attend a school to obtain their graduate degree
  • Attending/planning to attend an accredited two-year, four-year or technical school full-time (12 or more credit hours per semester)
  • In good academic standing (2.0 GPA or higher)

Can Section 8 residents apply for a NHF Scholarship?

Unfortunately only residents who reside in a NHA development are eligible for the NHF Scholarship. Click here for more information about other scholarships.


What is the NHF scholarship program process to determine recipients?

  • The NHF has a thorough application and interview process
  • Our application is available online in February and due in April
  • Applications require a recommendation, transcript, and the Student Aid Report (that a student receives once their FAFSA is complete)
  • Our volunteer scholarship committee interviews eligible applicants in May and June; the NHF announces final decisions in June

I am taking fewer than 12 credits per semester my school. Can I still apply for the NHF Scholarship?

Applicants must attend a two-year or four-year accredited higher education institution full-time (12 or more credit hours) in order to apply for the NHF Scholarship. You may be eligible for alternative school assistance programs through the Norwalk Housing Authority, including our Family Self-Sufficiency program. Please contact our office at 203-838-8471 to find out more.


What types of student aid are available outside of the NHF Scholarship Program?

There are three types of student aid:

  1. Grants and scholarships: Outright gifts of money that do not have to be repaid (you may need to maintain certain academic requirements to continue receiving them).
  2. Loans: Borrowed funds that usually charge interest and must be repaid even if you do not finish college.
  3. Work Study: Colleges receive federal funds to hire financially needy students for part-time jobs on campus.

Student aid often is a combination of all three, known as a financial aid “package.” The amount of your package depends on your financial need. Most federal and state aid is awarded based on financial need rather than academic merit; your financial need is determined by the information contained on your Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

You can find out early if you qualify for federal aid by accessing www.StudentAid.ed.gov/fafsa/estimate, but you will still need to complete the actual FAFSA by accessing www.fafsa.ed.gov.


What is a Student Aid Report?

Click here for more information on the Student Aid Report which you will receive after you submit your Free Application For Student Aid (FAFSA).